DOGS LIVE HERE


IF YOU DON'T WANT TO BE GREETED WITH PAWS AND SWINGING TAILS, DON'T COME INSIDE BECAUSE DOGS LIVE HERE

 

IF YOU DON'T LIKE THE FEEL OF A COLD NOSE OR WET TONGUE DON'T COME INSIDE BECAUSE DOGS LIVE HERE

 

IF YOU DON'T WANT TO STEP OVER MANY SCATTERED TOYS DON'T COME INSIDE BECAUSE DOGS LIVE HERE

 

IF YOU THINK A HOME SHOULD SMELL OF PERFUME DON'T COME INSIDE BECAUSE DOGS LIVE HERE

BUT IF YOU DON'T MIND ALL OF THIS, YO WILL INSTANTLY BE LOVED WHEN YOU COME INSIDE BECAUSE DOGS LIVE HERE!

Please check out the

Mastiff Club of America

for tons of information

 

The Mastiff is descended from the ancient Molosser recongnized as the oldest British breed. Different from the Mastiff of today which as been bred in its present form for less than two centuries. Mastiff type dogs found on Egyptian monuments dating to about 3,000 b.c. The history of Mastiff's is one of Dogs of War, Fighting Dogs, Guard dogs and the dog of Kings.  All noting the loyality, the strength, the courage, and the devotion of this fine animal. Throughout its long history, the Mastiff has contributed to the development of a number of dog breeds.

Unfortunately, World War I and World War II almost took the breed to extinction. It is believed that the number of Mastiffs left in England by 1947 had fallen to seven. Luckily, with the additional Mastiffs in the USA and Canada, and the dedication of Mastiff fanciers in all three countries, the breed has been brought back so that we may now enjoy these tremendous and most noble of all dogs.

The Mastiff is often referred to as "gentle giants" – loving and gentle. 

They are a fine loyal dog for the family. A proper Mastiff would never knowingly hurt a child or an adult as they are extremely tolerant but yet protective of a child and their human family. The Mastiff is very affectionate yet needy and they must be with their family. Not knowing their size they have the desire to try and be lap dogs by crawling up on you or the couch to snuggle their way into your heart. They need to be inside with the family not outside in a kennel or on a chain. They are very well behaved in the house.

Mastiffs are the largest in weight of the dog breeds, and can weigh anywhere from 170 lbs to 250+ lbs. Despite their great size, they are extremely gentle, docile, and sensitive.

Mastiffs do slobber, some more than others. They all will drool after eating or drinking, watching you eat, or if they are waiting for a tasty treat. You will need to keep plenty of slobber rags placed at strategic locations around the house. Routinely walk through the house to remove the slinggers that amazingly land in the craziest places.

Most Mastiffs do snore, sometimes quite loudly.

Mastiffs are expensive to purchase, raise, and maintain. While they don’t eat as much as you might think for such a large dog, they do eat a lot of food, especially while they are gaining up to five pounds of weight per week as a growing pup. A Mastiff may go through 40 to 80 lbs of dog food in a month. This will taper off as they mature to 4-8 cups per day. But it is an expense that must be thought through.

Mastiffs are also more expensive when it comes to veterinary and medical costs. Most medicine and antibiotic dosages are based on weight, and since Mastiff’s are the heaviest breed of dog you can imagine the amount of medication needed.  Not every Vet is trained or have the facilities to handle such a large animal as their needs are different than the typical dog. Please question your vet on their experience with large breed dogs.

To view some of the health issues that Mastiffs can have please click here Health and here

The Mastiff has special needs, its combination of grandeur, dignity and courage; calm and affectionate to its owners but capable of guarding.  The breed is innately good natured, easygoing and amazingly gentle. This is an extremely loyal breed, it is devoted to its family and they will give their whole heart to them, it will greive, love, be a peacemaker and a guardian to you and your family.

This breed is powerfully built, with a massive body, broad skull and head of generally square appearance.

The size should be very large, but it must be balanced by soundness. The body is massive with great breadth, especially between the forelegs, causing these to be set wide apart.The short coat is close-lying and the color is apricot, silver-fawn, fawn, or brindles apricot or fawn, always with black on the muzzle, ears, and nose and around the eyes.

They are the most noble of all dog breeds – the lion of dogdom.

Your new mastiff puppy should have already had its first set of vaccinations and have been wormed by the breeder. But will probably need another worming and another set or 2 of vaccinations

The first thing you need to be aware of is that even though your puppy has been vaccinated, your pup is “NOT” fully protected from diseases until it has all of its puppy shots and kennel cough vaccines

Do not let the puppy greet or play with strange dogs.

Do not take your puppy to a dog park

Do not let your puppy sniff where other dogs, or sniff where other dogs have gone to the bathroom.

Do not let your puppy eat from a dish that another dog has used.

Feeding

For the first 2 weeks, only feed your mastiff puppy the food the breeder recommended, after 14 days start introducing new foods and snacks. The reason for this is if the puppy you have just bought gets sick you will know it is not from a change in food or diet.  Plus, you always want to gradully change a dogs diet. Never feed cooked pork, beef or chicken bones they can splinter but you may give them raw bones.

REMEMBER, even though your mastiff puppy is large, it is still a baby and will sleep a great deal.

Do not take your puppy for a walk any farther then you can carry it back” . When your puppy is tired it will lie down and not move. Do not let your puppy play rough with other dogs and I recommend restricted play.  Their joints and bones just are not ready for rough play and can easily get injured. Please do not let your puppy climb up and down the stairs this is hard on thier hips plus they could easily fall or jump.

Please Never ever let your Mastiff or any other pet ride in the back of a truck!

To prepare for your new mastiff puppy you should buy.

An extra large dog crate I buy the 48 inch x 30 inch with a divider to expand as puppy grows.

Blankets and bedding.

Stainless Steel Food and water dishes.

An adjustable dog collar, I like the martingale type of collars they are nylon as well as chain so you have a slight choke chain response but is safe and a 6' Leash I prefer leather

Lots of hard chew toys. Nyla bones, Kong, but no rawhides or greenies

Dog food do not feed Large Breed Puppy food it is too high in Protein use an adult maintenance.

Lots of Drool towels for paws and lips placed all over the house.

PPuppy-Proofing:

 

Raise up all things that you do not want chewed up. They are just puppies and they will chew.

 

Child safety locks on kitchen and bathroom cabinets where cleaners and medications are kept

 

Keep garbage out of reach

 

Wrap up electrical cords so they are less noticable to the puppy

 

Raise all houseplants above their reach. Many of these plants are toxic

 

Prepare a place for their  food and water.

 

Set up a location for the puppy to be when you have to leave. Please do not ever tie up your puppy or full grown Mastiff

 

Excercise pens are great for this or a blocked off laundry room or kitchen all work great.

 

 

HOW to read a PEDIGREE

I get asked quite often how to read a pedigree the questions that come up are about Champions, multiple dogs in the same pedigree, the same dogs in a pedigree what should we look for and how do we know if it is a good pedigree. 

First thing I will say is do your research ask your breeders they should know their pedigrees, but ultimatly it is up to you to research.

First of just because a dog is papered does not mean they are great dogs and should be bred NOT ALL DOGS SHOULD BE BRED.  First thing is look for well known kennel names google the kennel name in pedigree see how long they have been breeding and what the dogs look like. Also, see if they have had their dogs health tested my going to www.offa.com.  This is a tool not all the great past kennels have done health testing but if they have been breeding for 20 plus years and you can see the type of dogs they are producing then feel comfortable seeing that kennel in your pedigree.  Champions in a pedigree again this is a tool there are some great Mastiff breeders that do not show their dogs and with the politcal games with any competition a dog with a championship title does not mean they are great fabulous dogs it just means they achieved a title and many handlers can put a title on anything. You will see different types of Mastiffs in the show ring. I personally don't breed to show my dogs I show my dogs because they are great but many show dogs are not the Mastiff standard just my opinion. 

Why are there the same dogs in the pedigree.  Breeding is learning genetics working off the best dogs and their genes and concentrating on them.  We are not puppy mill breeders if we line breed our dogs we are trying to take the best genes and work from them to do better.  We are not talking mother son or full brother sister etc.. these type of breedings are not going to build a pedigree and is more of what you would see from a bad breeder.  But uncle niece half brother half sister grandparent to grandkid is a good way to solidify a pedigree so do not be concerned as long as those particular dogs were great examples of the breed.  This could go deeper and I will be happy to share information to those that are interested.  

Multiple dogs in a pedigree.  I prefer not to breed this way they are called outcrossed breedings I will do when a pedigree is concentrated but to do it with every breeding you are not going to know what you are going to get because you are bringing in so many different genes there is no way to know what is dominant what health issues are dominant.  Again so much available infor to much to put here please contact me for more information.